The ‘Bots Are Back: the 9e Necrons

Every time Games Workshop comes out with a new edition, they release new minis and codexes for two armies to get everyone excited. Ninth Edition is no different, and this time out, GW has published army books for Space Marines, as well as for Necrons. So, let’s take a look at the latest Tome of the Toasters, shall we?

Weighting in at a trim 120 pages, the new Codex: Necrons is still too long to do a thorough examination, so I’ll just cover what jumped out at me from the rules sections. But just so you know, if you liked the Post-C’Tan-Sassy-and-Liberated-Robot fluff, and the Heavy-On-The-Spectral-Green art from previous versions, you’ll find more of the same in the latest.

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Drinking From A Firehose: The New Space Marines Codex

If you’re having deja vu, it’s because Games Workshop published a Space Marine codex in 2019, and here we are, a year later, with a brand new one for 9th Edition. So, consider this review a follow-on to the one I did before.

As always, I’m not going to cover everything, because there is so much jammed into the new book’s 200+ pages. Instead, I’ll only discuss the things that jumped out at me. Like last time, I focus on the rules, but rest assured that there are plenty of cool background material and artwork in the new codex, almost 90 pages’ worth.

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Armies of the Jungle: The Kurindans

In this series, we showcase armies used by your humble Jungle Guides. By detailing how the army was collected, how the background and color schemes were developed, and how the army is used on the battlefield, we hope that this series will provide inspiration for those interested in collecting similar armies.

First Sergeant Jeremiah Zumwalt had seen—and killed—many foul xenos over his decades of service to the Imperium, but he had never before seen these: purple reptilian humanoids accompanied by a variety of green monstrosities, and towering over all of them, a charcoal-gray beast with jagged dorsal spines, whose plodding footsteps actually made the ground shake beneath Zumwalt’s feet, and whose roars threatened to burst the eardrums of him and his men.

Not that First Sergeant Zumwalt knew why these aliens were here. As on almost every other terrestrial planet in the galaxy, nickel was a common metal here on Esmarkka IV, used mostly for making steel. The bastions and the small garrison of troops here were in case of raids by wandering human barbarians on this sparsely-settled world, and even so, they had not been necessary for several years.  

Yet now, this mine was under a determined attack by a horde of xenos, cloaked in swirling green gas that made shots go wide, and a living nightmare large enough to blot out the sun. 

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No Point (For Me) In Points Values

Unless someone insists, I’m not going to use Points Values in 40K ever again.

Like probably the vast majority of you–barring those folks who started playing during the recently-departed 8th Edition days–I’ve always used Points Values when making my army lists. For many years, I’ve set my lists at 2,000 points, which has meant splitting 5 out of my 6 armies into separate lists so that I could make sure to use every figure and vehicle I own. I’ve spent hours configuring them just so, and carefully calculating each point.

No more of that. From now on, I’m just using Power Ratings, even though I never thought much of them before.

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Armies of the Jungle: Twilight Marauders

In this series, we showcase armies used by your humble Jungle Guides. By detailing how the army was collected, how the background and color schemes were developed, and how the army is used on the battlefield, we hope that this series will provide inspiration for those interested in collecting similar armies.

by Patrick Eibel

When you have been playing and collecting for as long as I have, you may find yourself too many figures, figures you got for army ideas never-built, or just want to create another army to fight against your current armies.  This is somewhat how my (now rather large) Chaos force came about.

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1st Take on 9th Edition

Ehh. 

I was underwhelmed when I first saw the 9e Core Rules, but I had some hope that when the rest of the material arrived, I would enjoy the 9th Edition book as much as I did 8th.

That’s a big “Nope.” Let me address the new edition by discussing a few aspects of it. Ordinarily, I don’t start a review on a negative note, but I’m going to break that tradition now.

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“KD&D,” Part 4: Simpler & Better Clerics

This post is part of a series describing the rule changes I've made for my current fantasy role-playing campaign. "Kenton's Dungeons & Dragons," or "KD&D," is a full-fledged variant of the 1st Edition Advanced Dungeons & Dragons game initially released in 1977. Feel free to use some or all of these rule changes for your own D&D gaming, no matter what edition you play.

As I described in the inaugural post to this series, I’ve recently started playing 1e AD&D again, running a campaign for my neighbors and family.  While I’ve always enjoyed AD&D, the game system itself can be clunky and difficult, and some parts are, frankly, lame.

To make what I consider to be improvements to the core rules, I’ve borrowed ideas from issues of Dragon magazine and later D&D editions, as well as come up with a few of my own.  My operating motto for re-tooling the game is to make it, “Simpler & Better.”

In the previous post, I discussed changes I made to the number of character classes, and which races could play them. This time, as part of a deep dive into each class, I’ll fiddle with the rules from the Players Handbook (PHB), and Unearthed Arcana (UA) for clerics (I’ll cover druids in the next post).

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“KD&D,” Part 3: Simpler & Better Character Classes

This post is part of a series describing the rule changes I've made for my current fantasy role-playing campaign. "Kenton's Dungeons & Dragons," or "KD&D," is a full-fledged variant of the 1st Edition Advanced Dungeons & Dragons game initially released in 1977. Feel free to use some or all of these rule changes for your own D&D gaming, no matter what edition you play.

As I described in the inaugural post to this series, I’ve recently started playing 1e AD&D again, running a campaign for my neighbors and family.  While I’ve always enjoyed AD&D, the game system itself can be clunky and difficult, and some parts are, frankly, lame.

To make what I consider to be improvements to the core rules, I’ve borrowed ideas from issues of Dragon magazine and later D&D editions, as well as come up with a few of my own.  My operating motto for re-tooling the game is to make it, “Simpler & Better.”

In the previous post, I looked character races. This time, I’ll examine classes from the Players Handbook (PHB), and Unearthed Arcana (UA).

Continue reading ““KD&D,” Part 3: Simpler & Better Character Classes”

“KD&D,” Part 2: Simpler & Better Character Races

This post is part of a series describing the rule changes I've made for my current fantasy role-playing campaign. "Kenton's Dungeons & Dragons," or "KD&D," is a full-fledged variant of the 1st Edition Advanced Dungeons & Dragons game initially released in 1977. Feel free to use some or all of these rule changes for your own D&D gaming, no matter what edition you play.

As I described in the inaugural post to this series, I’ve recently started playing 1e AD&D again, running a campaign for my neighbors and family.  While I’ve always enjoyed AD&D, the game system itself can be clunky and difficult, and some parts are, frankly, lame.

To make what I consider to be improvements to the core rules, I’ve borrowed ideas from issues of Dragon Magazine and later D&D editions, as well as come up with a few of my own.  My operating motto for re-tooling the game is to make it, “Simpler & Better.”

In this post and the next one, I’d like to discuss creating characters. First up, let’s look at races, which, in AD&D, are covered in the Players Handbook (PHB), and in the supplement Unearthed Arcana (UA).

 

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